Dynamic Testing

Project Dynamic Testing with the TagTile: General

Researchers: Prof. dr. Wilma Resing and others

In co-operation with SeriousToys the Dynamic Testing Lab conducted a study into the usability of a dynamic test with “actual” “real” materials with an electronic board.

Starting points for the use of electronic “tangibles/materials”

  • Being provided with an accurate indication of the learning potential
  • Supporting children in the development of their cognitive skills
  • Following every step in the problem solving process in detail
  • Deducting training steps from the manner in which children solve a problem
  • Providing an indication of the cognitive developmental level as well as providing individual advice (suitable education)
  • Working in a standardised manner while motivating children optimally in a natural setting
  • Scoring a large variety of variables in an electronic manner and incorporating these in a report: need for instruction, quantity and type of help
  • Providing adaptive and gradual hints as part of the test
  • Providing children with individualised help based on a child’s individual needs
  • Using a methodology that makes using a computer, a keyboard and a computer mouse unnecessary

TagTile

tagtile

The TagTile is an electronic board on which games or tasks can be implemented. This board gives instructions and feedback (verbally, visually or by means of sounds) to the child. This means of testing can be used to:

  • Work in a standardised manner while motivating children optimally and working in a natural setting;
  • Score a large variety of variables electronically and incorporate these in a report: the need for instruction, quantity and type of help
  • Provide adaptive and gradual hints as part of the test
  • Provide children with individualised help based on a child’s individual needs
  • Be a method that makes using a computer, a keyboard and a computer mouse unnecessary.

Dynamic testing

All research using the TagTile consists of dynamic testing according to the principle of Pretest (without help) – Training / 2x Training – Posttest. Automated data collection includes the number of tasks a child solves correctly, the pieces of a task that were placed correctly, the time it takes a child to solve a task, the help a child benefits from, and the order in which a child places pieces of a puzzle. A number of studies were conducted, including 7 and 8 years old primary school students with different cultural backgrounds.